How to start an art collection: A novice’s guide

Art, Design / Typography

So, you like art. Maybe you go to some museums, you read some blogs, you follow some interesting people on Instagram. Maybe you read some books. But where and how do you go about hanging art on your walls? Actual art, not just something printed off sneakily at work from Pinterest, or an ikea postcard of something pretty (guilty on both accounts).

Well, after having a chat with online art platform Invaluable, I started to think a bit more about this. How would I, as an artist, go about creating an art collection? What tips would I give? Where would I begin?

So here you go, my tips on starting an art collection.

1. Firstly, what do we class as art?

Not meaning to get deep on the first subject, but it had to come first really. I have tonnes of shit on my wall – flyers from gigs, coffee shop loyalty cards, stickers from a tattoo shop. These, in my opinion are all art – despite their purpose. To get technical, Art is defined as,

“The expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power.”

So my first tip would be to collect things that you like. Don’t think that just because someone gave it to you on the street, you can’t frame it and class it as art.


2. Find artists you like

And buy from them directly. I am inspired by a lot of self made artists that I find and follow through Instagram. Many of them work for brands and businesses to make their bread and butter, but they also have a blog, or an online shop where you can buy their original prints. Buying from them directly means that the money goes to them, and it’s a personable, lovely transaction. Plus, you get to keep something really special by an artist you’ve coveted for a while.

Here’s a couple of artists that I am feeling inspired by recently… (you can see the theme of beautiful portraits of ladies, right?)

andsmile


Image sourced from @andsmilestudio Instagram 

Ella Masters


Image sourced from @_ellamasters_ Instagram 

Laura Bernard


Image sourced from @laurabernard_illustration Instagram 

Emma Block 


Image sourced from @emmablockillustraion Instagram 

The Ink Draw


Image sourced from @theinkdraw Instagram 

3. Antique shops & craft fairs

Browsing antique shops, vintage warehouses and craft fairs are some of my favourite past times. You never know what you’re going to find – and if you go in with an open mind then you never know what is going to catch your eye either. Never mind bagging a bargain, these pieces have more character than you can shake a stick at.

4. The Internet

Now we’re down to the nitty gritty – buying art online. Where, it must be said a lot of people probably begin. You can start small with something like Etsy, or go big with a place like Invaluable. Are you looking for big bucks, famous art – or something personalised, or to shop local? Whatever you want, there is 100% a website for that.


5. Make your own

Get some crayons, paint, paper, felt – whatever tickles your fancy, and carve some time out to be creative. It doesn’t matter if you ‘can’t draw’. Art can be anything your heart so desires (refer to point 2). And isn’t it great to hang your own masterpiece on the wall?


There you go – I hope this inspired you to go out and find some art, build on your current collection… or start one. Art is good for the soul.

Pastel buildings, Colombia

Pastel houses and balconies of dreams

Design / Typography, travel, Uncategorized

Wandering the streets and looking up from my phone is a fave activity of mine. I’m really into these colour palletes – dreamy pastels with 70’s vibes and flowers growing wild out of balconies.

Below is a nice little selection of beautiful houses, balconies, flowers, colours that caught my eye whilst I’ve been travelling. Must.Stop.Taking.So.Many.Photos. But somethings are just too lovely not to document.

Houses from… Cartegena (Colombia), Caye Caulker (Belize), Copan (Honduras), and Newtown (Current residence, Sydney).

Pastel buildings, SydneyPastel buildings, BelizePastel buildings, HondurasPastel buildings, ColombiaPastel buildings, BelizePastel buildings Newtown, SydneyPastel buildings, Sydney

 

5 tips to dealing with criticism

Advertising, Design / Typography, Trials & Tribulations

Image

It can be exhausting. Whether it be from colleagues, parents, clients, teachers, etc etc; it’s important to be able to take it and not let it get you down or get in your way.

I’m a bit of a sensitive person, I take offense to the slightest raised voice or blunt tone, and I can go right back in to my shell if I think someone is annoyed at me. I’ve always done things to the best of my ability, managed to do well in both school and college; therefore I was lucky that I received praise often.

University is a different kettle of fish, where you’re not surrounded by people who don’t care. You’re competing/learning/working with people who have the same interests as you, are of the same intelligence and ultimately may be better than you at certain things.

Again, working full time can throw a sensitive person in to even deeper waters. In the advertising/marketing/design industry, there are going to be some bold characters. Working in a creative environment means that a lot of work is interpretation, and not everyone’s is going to be the same. Learning how to take all of this in and come out of the other side better for it is vital.

  1. Don’t take it personally. Criticism is needed. If no one ever gave it, everyone would be walking around being right about everything; and that wouldn’t work. If your colleague doesn’t like your copy, it isn’t because you wrote it; it’s because the writing itself isn’t hitting the spot.
  2. Ask for feedback. Do what you can with criticism – improve. Whatever it may be, whether it’s a photo you have taken, the way you are managing a project, an essay you have written or even a cake you have baked. Ask why, what, how, so that next time, you can do better.
  3. Does it really matter? Despite constructive criticism being important, moaning isn’t. Ask yourself if the person giving the criticism is someone who is in a position to do so. If not, sack it off and don’t worry about it. If they are, do something about it.
  4. Keep going.  If someone is getting under your skin with the amount of bad things they have to say about your work, it can be easy to give up with the attitude of ‘if I can’t do anything right, I’ll do nothing’. Don’t let that happen. Be proud of any work that you’ve done – if you know it was to your highest standard; believe that it is despite what someone might say about it. If you know you could do better, then do better.
  5. Believe in yourself. It’s cliché, I know. However it really does help if you know yourself whether criticism is helping you or not. Sometimes it is, and you can learn to take it on the chin and do better next time. Sometimes it’s not, and someone may be in a bad mood and taking it out on you. This is when you have to let it go over your head.

When given in the right way, and received in the right way, criticism can be good. It can make you strive to achieve better, and when you receive the compliments, you’ll know you’ve worked hard for it.